IIE Blog Opening Minds
IIE Blog Opening Minds
  • Join the Conversation: “What will it take to Double Study Abroad?”

    By: IIE on Tuesday, May 20, 2014

    The following blog entries comprise the 11 Big Ideas from the IIE Green paper, “What will it take to Double Study Abroad?” We invite you to add to the discussion by commenting on one or more of the 11 blog entries in this series.


  • 500 Days and Beyond in Education

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Friday, August 22, 2014

    We stand now at approximately 500 days from the initial target date for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals set in 1990. These goals represent the most ambitious shared aspirations of humanity the modern world ever assembled. As we take measure now of the successes and shortfalls of this global effort, redouble our efforts for real, sustained progress in these final 500 days, and establish the framework for beyond 2015, I am inspired by what has been achieved and worried about what comes next.


  • What Young Girls Can Achieve With a Good Education

    By: Edie Cecil on Thursday, August 14, 2014

    The HER girls, participants of IIE’s Higher Education Readiness (HER) program, have been busy over the past few months with tutoring, meeting with their mentors, and the important year-end exams. This summer they are attending entrepreneurship and English language training workshops.


  • Top 10 Tips for Immersing Yourself in the Culture While Studying Abroad

    By: Daniel Obst on Thursday, August 7, 2014

    In an op-ed in the New York Times about the ‘world’s coolest places,’ columnist Nick Kristof writes that "travel can also be an education, a step toward empathy and international understanding." At IIE, we couldn't agree more. In fact, this was one of the most important factors that led to the establishment of IIE in 1919.


  • What’s in a Name? Why We Are Now the IIE Center for Academic Mobility Research and Impact

    By: Mirka Tvaruzkova on Monday, August 4, 2014

    Launched in 2012, IIE’s research center is now changing its name to the IIE Center for Academic Mobility Research and Impact. Why are we doing this and why now? It is not just a matter of semantics. Instead, it reflects the evolving nature of our work and of the emphasis the Institute places on measuring the impact of what we do. While IIE continues to be at the forefront of applied research on international student mobility through Open Doors and Project Atlas, our Center’s work has expanded rapidly to studying the impact of international higher education programs—including scholarships and fellowships—on individuals, institutions, and communities. This shift in our work reflects a growing awareness within the broader field of international education about the importance of assessing and documenting the profound and sustained influence that international education exchange can have.


  • Letter from Brasília—What 100,000 New Scholarships Mean for Brazilian and U.S. Students

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Monday, July 28, 2014

    Last month, the President of Brazil announced that the Federal Government would provide an additional 100,000 scholarships for Brazilian undergraduates to participate in the Brazil Scientific Mobility Program, which enables them to study during their junior year in the United States and other countries. Currently over 80,000 students are participating in the program. The announcement means that by 2018, some 200,000 will have had the chance to learn another language and study and intern in relevant fields for the country's employment needs.


  • The Syrian Refugee Crisis and Higher Education: A View from Turkey

    By: James King on Friday, July 25, 2014

    “Thank God we’re alive, but we are dying an intellectual death.”

    Wearing a colorful headscarf and a seemingly permanent look of sorrow, an intense and charismatic professor I’ll call Noora shared with me her tragic story of fleeing Syria and becoming a refugee. I was in Reyhanlı, a dusty border town in Turkey’s southernmost province, to meet with Syrians whose university education and academic work had been interrupted indefinitely due to the conflict in their homeland. Among the more than three million Syrian refugees, including an estimated one million in Turkey, there are tens of thousands of university students and professors.


  • What Entrepreneurship Educators Should Know: Lessons from the Price Babson Symposium for Entrepreneurship Educators

    By: Emil Levy on Wednesday, July 23, 2014

    Jam-packed and intense—these are two adjectives I would use to describe the four-day-long Price Babson Symposium for Entrepreneurship Educators (SEE), which I had the privilege of participating in this past May. The symposium, which is one of the leading training programs for entrepreneurship educators, had already graduated 33 classes, comprising more than 3200 individuals from over 650 institutions worldwide. As a participant in SEE 34, I had the pleasure to collaborate, brainstorm, and learn from and with 59 other educators from 13 different countries (from the United States and Canada to Thailand, Bahrain, Brazil, and Argentina). Moreover, I spent a significant part of the training in a group.


  • What Role Can MOOCs Play in the Development Agenda? Five Key Questions

    By: Rajika Bhandari on Tuesday, July 15, 2014

    With the Millennium Development Goals nearing their deadline, the development sector has been rife with speculation about what the post-2015 development agenda will look like and what role, if any, higher education should play in this future outlook. So it is only appropriate that the United Nations is asking whether Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)—with their focus on offering tertiary-level courses for mass consumption—are a panacea for increasing access to tertiary education in the developing world, or whether they will instead widen the gap between those with access to higher education and those without.


  • Letter from Madrid: How did King Felipe VI Come to America?

    By: Dr. Allan E. Goodman on Wednesday, July 2, 2014

    The reception for Spain's new king, Fulbright and Georgetown alumnus Felipe VI, involved a very long receiving line at the Palace. Besides the setting, which is magnificent and historic, it was the modest event it was proclaimed to be. The guests were divided into a number of immense waiting rooms filled with friends, diplomats, ministers, and military leaders. I am sure there were other Americans, but none that I could see or hear.


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About Opening Minds

For more than nine decades, the Institute of International Education has been at the forefront of international education. The Opening Minds blog is IIE’s take on how this field continues to change. Here the Institute’s leaders will explore international educational exchange, global student mobility, institutional partnerships, international development, and other topics and trends that are shaping higher education around the world.

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